Blue-light blocking, fashion-limited orange tinted glasses were recently touted as sleep solutions in the New York Times. I was impressed with how the author framed the "blue-blockers."

The article gave a simple and responsible message: there is solid evidence suggesting that tools such as the orange tinted glasses are capable of blocking blue-light from devices or other sources and can help the body better prepare for sleep while enhancing sleep quality.

I AGREE

I absolutely agree with this message. I was thrilled that the author dodged the obvious temptation to suggest that wearing these glasses before bedtime will magically help you slip into a more restful slumber. 

Evidence does indicate that blue-blocker glasses benefit sleep preparation and quality by blocking blue-light pollution. When artificial blue light is successfully defended before bedtime, melatonin levels are allowed to rise as they should and your body is better prepared for a more powerful sleep. 

AT THE END OF THE DAY

Here's the thing - slapping these novel spectacles on before bed without addressing other aspects of your sleep environment or changing lifestyle habits that fracture sleep will likely take a bite out of their effectiveness. These orange glasses can be a great tool in your sleep enhancing quest but by themselves they will not act as a VIP credential for easy access to dreamland. 

 

 

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Tim DiFrancesco, PT, DPT, ATC, CSCS is the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for the Los Angeles Lakers and Founder of TD Athletes Edge, where he provides fitness, recovery and nutrition guidance to aspiring and professional athletes. For training advice, visit www.tdathletesedge.com and follow him on Twitter/Instagram through @tdathletesedge.

References:

Lagakos, Bill (2013, October 10). Fiat lux. http://caloriesproper.com/tag/blue-light Retrieved April 7, 2015

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